The Pot Calling The Kettle Black

I just read this story at USA Today about Anhueser-Busch upset at the National Football League regarding how they have handled cases of domestic violence. USA Today ran a statement by Anhueser-Busch that reads:

“We are disappointed and increasingly concerned by the recent incidents that have overshadowed this NFL season. We are not yet satisfied with the league’s handling of behaviors that so clearly go against our own company culture and moral code,” Anheuser-Busch said in a statement to USA TODAY Sports.

“We have shared our concerns and expectations with the league.”

They are concerned with the NFL’s handling of these behaviors? How about any concern about how alcohol fuels men (and women) to do dumb and violent things in drunken stupors? How many college girls have been sexually assaulted as a result of someone’s decision making process affected by alcohol? How many wives and children get smacked around after a Sunday night football game when the husband/father is ramped up by Budweiser and upset at the outcome of the game? How many families have been broken apart because alcohol’s role in fatal accidents?

Is alcohol the root of these problems? I know it is not. Excessive alcohol consumption magnifies the brokenness is men and women every where. This statement from Anheuser-Busch reeks with irony as they call out the NFL. Who is calling out Anheuser-Busch?

About Steve LaMotte

Husband and father of three amazing children. Campus Minister of Wesley College in Dover, Delaware. Pastor at Hope United Methodist Church in Dover, Delaware. Elder in the Pen-Del Conference. Fan of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers. Lover of music that makes hipsters cringe.
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One Response to The Pot Calling The Kettle Black

  1. Billy McMahon says:

    I suppose people assume that alcohol is a “neutral” thing, kind of like music. Not inherently bad, but people can do with it as they please. I think this assumption is somewhat problematic once you consider the social consequences of overconsumption.

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