An Interesting View on Sarah Palin- VP Nominee

I have chosen not to write too many politcal things here in my blog, but today I will be writing a little. This is such a unique election year where we have the opportunity to have either the first African-American President or the First Female Vice President. In a country that believes in the equality of all people- it is about time that we have the opportunity to elect someone other than a white male.

Dan Kimball, in his blog Vintage Faith writes about how Conservative Christians are excited about the nomination of Sarah Palin for Vice President because of her Christian Values, Pro-life stance, and other various reasons. You can his blog here. Dan’s point is an interesting one. If John McCain is elected president and Sarah Palin becomes Vice President, we recognize that Palin will become president and lead 300 million people if McCain is unable to do his duties as president. Kimball’s point is this, while Palin could logically become the leader of 300 million people, she could still not preach in many of our conservative denominations pulpits. These are churches who believe that only men can teach or preach.

This is an interesting question to consider. How will churches who refuse to open the pulpit to women who exhibit gifts and calling from God deal with a woman Vice President who could possibly become President? It could open up some interesting conversation!

About Steve LaMotte

Husband and father of three amazing children. Campus Minister of Wesley College in Dover, Delaware. Pastor at Hope United Methodist Church in Dover, Delaware. Elder in the Pen-Del Conference. Fan of the Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers. Lover of music that makes hipsters cringe.
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3 Responses to An Interesting View on Sarah Palin- VP Nominee

  1. Matt Ralph says:

    I’m just guessing here, but I think many who are against women being in the pulpit would argue that there is a separation of church and state and that there is a difference between a woman leading in a secular setting as opposed to a spiritual setting. Where it gets sticky is when you factor in the five kids – one heading to Iraq, another pregant and the youngest with special needs – and the view of many Christians that a mother should stay home and raise the family. To many, the biblical mandate is for the man to work and be the spiritual head at home while the mom stays home and raises the children. I’m pretty sure this is even the model advocated by Palin cheerleader James Dobson. I think people who preach this patriarchal view from the pulpit are showing partisan colors and putting political expediency before religious conviction when they praise Palin. If her family situation were different, I think they could stand on the separation of state argument, though that could lead to many other questions of viewpoints that counter separation of church and state principles. As for me, I don’t have a problem with women pastors or women presidents, but do question a politician whether male or female, Democrat or Republican, putting his or her career before family, especially when the said family is going through an extremely difficult time.

  2. The family issue of Palin is an interesting one to consider. The country probably hasn’t had this sort of issue since JFK was president and had two boys. I wonder if it will become more of a distraction than the issues…and whether that is justified or not.

  3. Matt Ralph says:

    While I don’t think it’s fair to hold her to a higher standard than any other politician with a young family or base your voting decision either for or against on this basis, it does and should raise questions about the role her faith and her family values really play in her politics and ambition for higher office. Beyond the politics of it, she is a celebrity now and she is a Christian role model to the world so I think it’s fair to consider the questions her candidacy raises.

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